How to Stay Top of Mind: Use An App to Send Postcards

app to send postcards
app to send postcards

How to Stay Top of Mind: Use An App to Send Postcards

For a time, it appeared that the days of sending holiday postcards to loved ones were long gone. Modern technology has changed the game, with E-cards available to send at an instant. Yet with this transition the process of delivering a message has lost its magic.

For many recipients, online E-cards lack the novelty of their physical predecessors, and certainly lack the sentiment. It’s the thought that counts after all, and a surprise card in the post feels much more sincere than a hastily sent instant-message.

Does technology then mark the end of the physical postcard? Much the opposite, technological innovation ensures it a future.

New technologies are hitting the market-place whereby users can now use an app to send postcards that are personalised and custom-made for the intended recipient.

And it’s all done straight from their smartphones, perfect for sending holiday snaps to loved ones who are still offline or simply to give someone a thoughtful surprise. 

Stay In Touch Using an App to Send Postcards

Postcards have a long history in communication. Since at least 1840, people have sent postcards as a means of keeping in touch, and the sending of postcards rapidly became a holiday tradition.

A short note and a scenic, comedic or symbolic picture and those back home would know they were in the thoughts of the holiday-maker. New apps such as Postogram and Touchnote offer new ways to keep in touch using modern technology, without losing the excitement and nostalgia that a physical postcard can offer.

Whether it’s a shot of Machu Picchu from a grand backpacking adventure, snaps from a recent holiday or even just family photos, using an app to send postcards from a mobile phone is a quick and easy process. Users simply choose the photo they wish to use, add a frame or effect if desired, type a personal message and enter the recipient’s address.

The high-quality photo-card is then printed and sent straight to the door, complete with printed personalised message on the back. Fees are paid using a debit or credit card on a purchase-by-purchase basis, much like buying a post-card from the shop.

Better For Business

The mobile postcard process can also be utilised by businesses looking to keep in touch with customers and stakeholders.

Printed cards are a great way to communicate offers, important reminders, or even to send meaningful greetings on celebratory occasions such as a customer’s birthday or Christmas.

By sending high-quality, personalised cards in the post rather than regular, move-to-junk emails, businesses show a degree of care and enthusiasm which simply can’t be delivered online.

Old Is Gold!

The postcard tradition is far from dying out. For many people, the feelings of excitement, curiosity and nostalgia of finding a postcard pushed through the letter box just can’t be beaten by online messages.

Conclusion

With the option to convert photos into meaningful cards, mobile applications have given a modern twist to the traditional postcard.

And now that we can use an app to send postcards straight from our smartphones, there’s no need to hunt for stamps or search for a post box – what could be easier? Phone apps may actually keep some old traditions alive. 🙂

About the Author

Paul Thompson is the Director for Quick Envelopes, which produces quality printed envelopes and charity envelopes for businesses across the UK.

Featured images:

  • App to Send Postcards

    How to Stay Top of Mind: Use An App to Send Postcards

    License: Royalty Free or iStock source: https://pixabay.com/en/letters-paper-colorful-post-stack-565554/

Get More Killer Tips

Subscribe To Our Mailing List And Get Interesting Stuff And Updates To Your Email Inbox

Thank you for subscribing.

Something went wrong.

Select Language

Get more killer tips like these
in your inbox

Subscribe To Our Mailing List And Get Interesting Stuff And Updates To Your Email Inbox

Thank you for subscribing.

Something went wrong.